Archive for the ‘Author interviews’ Category:

Janet Lee Carey Interviewed by the Mad Queen

rsz_1in_the_time_of_dragon_moon_high_res_coverI loved IN THE TIME OF DRAGON MOON! And not just because I was around as it was being born. Reading the finished book (which I stayed up all night to do), was a completely different experience from hearing tantalizing bits of the manuscript during the three years Janet was writing. I loved living in the pages of this book with the spirited Uma, and Jackrun, the boy who breathes fire and has dragon in his blood.

 

 

 

 

 

We were able to catch a few minutes with Queen Adela, as she interviewed the “bard,” Janet Lee Carey.

 

About the Book:
Beware the dark moon time when love and murder intertwine
          All Uma wants is to become a healer like her father and be accepted by her tribe. But when the mad queen abducts her and takes her north, Uma’s told she must use her healing skills to cure the infertile queen by Dragon Moon, or be burned at the stake. Uma soon learns the queen isn’t the only danger she’s up against. A hidden killer out for royal blood slays the royal heir. The murder is made to look like an accident, but Uma, and the king’s nephew Jackrun, sense the darker truth. Together, they must use their combined powers to outwit a secret plot to overthrow the Pendragon throne. But are they strong enough to overcome a murderer aided by prophecy and cloaked in magic?

~In the Time of Dragon Moon is a story of courage and romance that readers will not soon forget.~ VOYA

WORLD-BUILDING WORKSHOP WITH JANET LEE CAREY “From Elves to Aliens”

Saturday, May 23, 1-3, University Bookstore, Bellevue

Do you write fantasy or sci-fi or create worlds for games? Create the natural setting from the ground up with believable ecosystems and interdependent life forms. Add societies with interesting political, religious, and economic systems. Make a world vivifies your unique story ideas. It’s a demanding process, but ask the right questions, and all the elements from natural setting to social structures combine to create the inevitable conflicts and tensions each story demands. Come ready to discuss ideas and do a fun interactive world-building activity.

Sign up at http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/1360728 Price includes workshop, refreshments, handouts and a signed copy of In the Time of the Dragon Moon or other works by Janet Lee Carey.

Book Trailer:

Janet Lee Carey grew up in the bay area under towering redwoods that whispered secrets in the wind. When she was a child she dreamed of becoming a mermaid (this never happened).She also dreamed of becoming a published writer (this did happen after many years of rejection). She is now an award-winning author of nine novels for children and teens. Her Wilde Island Chronicles are ALA Best Books for Young Adults. She won the 2005 Mark Twain Award and was finalist for the Washington State Book Award. Janet links each new book with a charitable organization empowering youth to read and reach out. She tours the U.S. and abroad presenting at schools, book festivals and conferences for writers, teachers, and librarians. Janet and her family live near Seattle by a lake where rising morning mist forms into the shape of dragons. She writes daily with her imperious cat, Uke, seated on her lap. Uke is jealous of the keyboard. If Janet truly understood her place in the world, she would reserve her fingers for the sole purpose of scratching behind Uke’s ear, but humans are very hard to train.

Visit her website here

Thanks again to Janet Lee Carey for appearing. For other stops on the Dragon Moon blog tour please click here.

An Interview with Author Lois Brandt + teen writing with Lois at Bellevue College

Lois Brandt, Writer, Seattle

Photo by Meryl Schenker

One of the cool things about taking teen writing at Bellevue College, is working with a published author. Lois Brandt (who is certifiably awesome) teaches Writing Short Stories in the Teenage Novelist program. Students rave about her classes, which have included the “Write a Novel in 30 Days” class she usually teaches in November (to go along with NaNoWriMo) and “Editing Your Manuscript.” Lois is a prolific author of short fiction, and her new book, Maddie’s Fridge is coming out in September!

Teenage Novelist: Writing Short Stories

7/21/2014 – 7/25/2014 OR 8/4/2014 – 8/8/2014

Every story has a beginning middle and end, but how do you write stories that make your readers lean forward to find out what happens next? In this short story class students learn characterization and plotting. We will create memorable characters and chase them through a 2000 – 7000 word story. Once our stories are drafted we learn to edit and polish. Each student will leave the class with at least one completed short story. All genres are welcome.

Interview with Lois Brandt

1.       What were you writing when you were a teenager?

When I was a teenager I was writing a novel set in the Civil War. I was particularly interested because my Mom and Dad’s families fought on separate sides, so I wrote about a family that split down the middle. Two brothers wanted to fight for the South and two brothers for the North. The viewpoint character just wanted the family back together.

2.       You have a book, Maddie’s Fridge, coming out in September. What did you say or do when you found out it was being published?

To be honest, I broke into tears. Maddi’s Fridge is a story that has been in my heart since I was about ten. Stories and events stick inside my head until I give them voice on paper. In this case, I couldn’t forget the day I found out my best friend had no food in her home. This wasn’t a temporary “Mom and Dad were too busy to shop.”  They had absolutely no food and were days away from their mom’s payday. A discovery like that changes your world. It did not make the news (“American family has no food”), but it changed forever the way I looked at people with less money or resources. These are our friends and neighbors who are struggling for food, housing, and jobs. What do you do when your best friend is in trouble? Maddi’s Fridge tells that story.

3.       What are some of your favorite things about working with teen writers?

Teen writers are brilliant. I say that in all humility. I am awed by the ideas that teens come up with and where they take the writing prompts and exercises I give them. They are also quick to learn and willing to try new things. Some write with brilliant voices, others have unique ideas and/or characters. All bring something interesting to the class.

4.       What advice do you have for teens who hope to be published?

The first is a caveat: Writers are about writing. Yes, we want to publish and yes, all of us are at this very moment trying to get paid for our work.  There is this whole business side that we really have to pay attention to.  But for now, write.  I have a game I play with myself. If someone asks what I do, and I’ve met my daily writing goal, then I allow myself to say I write. If I have not writtin, I say my other profession — teaching. If I’m extremely frustrated (missed a writing day), I list my profession as cat sitter. If you want to be published: write. The more you write, the better you’ll be. The better you are, the greater your chance of publication.

 

What Happens Next?

 Week 1, July 14-18

Teenage Novelist: The Novel in a Nutshell

Teen Poets: Dancing on the Razor’s Edge

Teenage Novelist: Talking To Your Characters

 Week 2, July 21-25

Creating Graphic Novels (Dana Sullivan. Waitlisted)

Young Writers’ Workshop (Waitlisted)

Teenage Novelist: Writing Short Stories (Lois Brandt)

Teenage Novelist: Scenes and Dreams

Geek Fiction Writing

Week 3, July 28-August 1

Teenage Novelist: Plotting and Scheming

Teenage Novelist: Revisioning the Novel

Teenage Novelist: Publishing

 Week 4, August 4-8

Teenage Novelist: Novel Intensive

Teenage Novelist: Writing Short Stories (Lois Brandt)

Teenage Novelist: Live-Action Writing

 

And don’t forget August 10-13

Summer EpicWrite Camp!!!  (not affiliated with BC)

REGISTER FOR EPICWRITE