Fifty Days in France #1 String Theory

It was my first trip abroad in 32 years. For two months I wandered solo from Paris to the French countryside and attempted time-travel. In my computer was a half-completed novel called Looking Glass Girl.

The Writer as Actor: On Location

Deep Characterization Exercise #1 Being Two Places at Once

The purple mass looked for a moment like a plump of organ pipes, then like a stack of rolls of cloth set up on end,

Remembering Madeleine

“You have to write the book that wants to be written. And if the book will be too difficult for grown-ups, then you write it for children.”
–Madeleine L’Engle

I was ten when my librarian grandmother pulled from her suitcase a book called A Wrinkle in Time

Today I must retravel

The taut ground of soothsayer
Who broods in caverns for a glimpse of light.
How have I lost the glinting stone
I kept so long in my fist?

Mom’s Gift

My mom has always been all about stories. When I was little, she read and read to me: Winnie the Pooh, Ramona the Pest,

That Character You Love to Hate

Sometimes it’s the little things…

Writing antagonists can be almost too much fun. Of course, we don’t want to make the ALL bad. We need to show them as balanced human beings.

I have never told you

“I have never told you.” Five words that can deepen your characters, add page-turning plot elements, and shed light on motivation.

When I talk to my characters (and yes,